In like a lion, out like a lamb… welcome to March’s Pick ‘N Mix, a real mixed bag of treats this month:

– First of all, a postscript of sorts to last month’s Pick ‘N Mix, the “credit crunch edition”: You’ve all surely read it by now, but in case you haven’t, Holland Cotter’s article, “The Boom Is Over! Long Live the Art!” in the New York Times is well worth a read. Complementing some of Francis McKee’s comments that I quoted in last month’s edition, Cotter writes: “Anyone with memories of recessions in the early 1970s and late ’80s knows that we’ve been here before, though not exactly here. There are reasons to think that the present crisis is of a different magnitude: broader and deeper, a global black hole. Yet the same memories will lend a hopeful spin to that thought: as has been true before, a financial scouring can only be good for American art, which during the present decade has become a diminished thing.” Also, over at New Curator, there’s an article on creative use of “slack spaces”, which are some of the thousands of retail shops that have been vacated due to the credit crunch and not rented. As Pete at New Curator writes: “What better way to encourage economic stimulus than making sure commercial properties don’t fall into ruin and improving the image of the surrounding area?”

– I’m contemplating writing a whole article about “guest” curators and freelance curators, and their place in the market. Until then, maybe you can just read what I’m reading: an article on the American Association of Museums website called “The Stranger Among Us: Managing the Guest Curator Relationship”, and an article by Sharon Heal entitled “Be My Guest” in the February issue of interview with the ever-interesting curator Nato Thompson at art:21. Favourite quote: “As much as the onslaught of cultural production over the last fifty years has radically altered capital’s relationship to aesthetics, it has also made us much more aware that knowledge has a form, and that there are a myriad of forms for the delivery of information and the production of knowledge. Basically, knowledge is a performance, whether it is the stage of the classroom, or the aesthetics of a typeface in a book, to the performance in a street, to a multi-channel video projection.” A satisfying statement to unpick, which led me to ponder how curators perform knowledge.

– A brief article about the internationalism of the curatorial profession in the Japan Times: “Why Curators Stay at Home“. To sum up, it asks why more Japanese curators are not “super curators”, zooming around the globe, and the article comes up with the rather predictable answer that in order to be international, one must rack up a few air miles and be willing to exchange. Worth a read for the interview snippets with Fumio Nanjo, though.

– A fascinating piece entitled Whither Curatorial studies? is available on Artworld Salon. This piece rightly interrogates the existence of curatorial degree programmes and what they hope to accomplish and equip their students to do. “Undoubtedly the role of curator has been squeezed too narrowly between administration and dealmaking; but the travesty may be that curatorial studies programs fail to acknowledge this when they recruit students and collect their often sizeable tuitions. Shouldn’t we then ask what sort of training curatorial programs are giving their students?” Of course, similar questions could be directed at so many fine art degree programmes and humanities programmes as well — scores of artists leave art school without even knowing if their work fits into a commercial market or not, and if it does, what to do with that information. However, this essay at Artworld Salon is right to focus on curatorial studies, a field of study that, due the competitive jobs marketplace and varying contexts within which curators can work, demands much of those designing the curriculum.

– …and, this just in: Nat Muller has reviewed the recent symposium at the Witte de With, “The Curators”. A taste: “the curator as the new rock star, the self-proclaimed priests and priestesses of the art scene, the critics’ darlings or foes, the curator as genius, the curator as fascist, the curator as the icon we love to hate, or adore. It’s a lot of pressure…expectations were high.”

P.S. Don’t forget — some of these articles don’t stay online forever. If you want to refer to them in future, develop your own archiving system or use Evernote.

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