There is an article on the “DiY curating” scene in Seattle by Regina Hackett in a recent issue of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.

The article is fairly long and profiles a number of opportunistic young curators, who have harnessed unique venues to host their shows – ranging from the back of a truck, a local café, and a virtual island in the virtual world Second Life.

Seattle currently boasts a wealth of excellent young curators. While a few have found jobs at major arts institutions, there aren’t nearly enough of these jobs to go around in a field that’s booming in major urban centers everywhere.

That means curators of Van Nostrand’s generation, even with solid academic records (she has a master’s degree in contemporary art history from Richmond American University in London), have to make their own opportunities.

I would say this is probably a given for just about any urban center. The demand for professional positions in the creative industries will always outstrip the number of posts available. By highlighting the unusual and innovative practices of these young curators working on the fringes, the author of this article accentuates the fact that though these curators may not have top posts in museums or galleries, the exhibitions they are developing are professional grade.

“What it means to be a curator is more agile and open than it used to be,” he [Fionn Meade] said. “Curatorial thinking crosses disciplines. The field benefits from what people from a range of backgrounds can contribute.”

The very definition of “curator” is certainly more open than it used to be. At any rate, it will be interesting to follow the careers of these young curators and the artists they are selecting for their exhibitions. These qualities of openness and agility that they are demonstrating now will certainly be assets to them throughout their careers.

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